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If I never hear that question again it will be too soon. A stigma that comes with beingsssLandra an erotic romance author is that we write smut. You know, naughty books that talk about sex or graphically describe the act, with no real story. After the twentieth time of listening to the question, coupled with a raised eyebrow or a general blank expression (shocking, I know), I want to call them all prudes and tell them to grow up.

Hilariously enough my own sister, albeit much younger sister – an infant really (she’s turning 18 in May), wondered if I wrote erotic romance, or romance in general, because I didn’t get enough action in real life.

This leads me to say… I can’t control my characters or the stories that pop up in my head. I write them because they ask to exist. If they get a little kinky or decide to keep things closed door that’s up to them, but I’m not going to change my story or clean up the characters way of telling said story just because someone can’t wrap their minds around one of the genres I write in. Sex is sex, is kink is kink, and it’s out there for the world to see.

Does it get exhausting defending stories, not only my own, that I’m proud of?

Yes, it does.

Does it hurt when family members and even friends can’t understand why I write what I do?

You bet.

Does it make it hard for me to be more out there and open to promoting my books everyone?

Sure it does, especially when the word smut seems to be the romance book equivalent to whore or porn.

Of course, I won’t knock fellow Silken Sheets contributors for being proud of writing smut or embracing the word instead of allowing it to be attached as a negative connotation to their stories.

Yet – as authors, I often wonder if we somehow help encourage this characterization of our genre. And, if we can be the ones to encourage others to quit demeaning our work. Hell, Penthouse is still in business. Maybe I shouldn’t laugh about it, or give the sly smile coupled with my eyes darting away like I’m guilty. No, I should get angry, even mildly peeved, at the debasement of something I worked hard at.

Or is it simply my duty to deal with the stereotype, let out a sigh, and just answer the question – So you write smut?

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